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Additional online benefits to placing a notice for your loved one
Adding charitable donations
Adding charitable donations
Families can raise charitable donations in memory of their loved one with payments made directly to the charities.
Unlimited online photo gallery
Unlimited online photo gallery
Multiple photos can be added at point of booking and directly on the notice once it has been published for free.
Unlimited Tributes
Unlimited Tributes
Families, friends, neighbours, colleagues etc can pay tribute and messages of condolence online free of charge forever.
Sharing a loved ones Notice
Sharing a loved ones Notice
Families and friends can share via various social channels, one single share can go further than you think.

Advice, guides & articles

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Social Media Kindness Day and World Kindness Day
Published 08/11/2021
Social Media Kindness Day (SMKD) takes place annually on 9th November. SMKD was created to encourage people to be kinder to others when using social media. Sometimes people say things over social media that they wouldn’t say directly to someone’s face, as they cannot see the person’s reaction and the hurt and upset that can be caused by their words. SMKD was also created in memory of TV Presenter Caroline Flack, whose birthday would have been 9th November. The first Social Media Kindness Day took place on 9th November 2020. Caroline’s tribute page can be found here: Caroline Flack The goal is to make social media a kinder place, and to remind people that unkindness should never be tolerated, whether it is face to face or through a screen. How to take part in Social Media Kindness Day:
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Who was Guy Fawkes?
Published 04/11/2021
Remember, remember, the fifth of November Gunpowder treason and plot We see no reason Why Gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot…. Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Bonfire Night or Fireworks Night, takes place annually on 5th November, predominantly in the UK. It celebrates the failure of the Gunpowder Plot.
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Do you have to pay for a child's funeral?
Published 01/11/2021
For most, losing a child is unthinkable - a tragedy that most parents can’t even imagine having to go through, let alone prepare for. Unfortunately, some parents do go through this, and are then faced with arranging a funeral for their child. At an already emotional time, the expense of paying for the funeral can only add to the distress. The Children’s Funeral Fund was established in July 2019, meaning that anyone living in England would no longer be charged for a standard burial or cremation of a child under the age of 18. Scotland and Wales both have similar schemes in place. The scheme covers the burial and cremation fees, and also includes a £300 contribution towards a coffin, casket or shroud. The scheme is available to all families, regardless of income or nationality. The only conditions are that the child must have been under the age of 18 at the time of death, or stillborn after the 24th week of pregnancy, and the burial or cremation must take place in England. The Funeral Director dealing with the funeral will claim the money back from the scheme themselves, however parents can claim directly if they choose not to use a Funeral Director.
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How to register a death in the UK
Published 28/10/2021
There will be so many thoughts and feelings that will be flying around in your head when someone close to you passes away, that sometimes the most obvious practicalities are forgotten. In this blog I want to try and help guide you on one of the very first steps that must be taken, and that is legally registering their death. Did you know it’s actually illegal not to register a death? To find out more you can read this article by Jack Colwill on Mirror.co.uk.
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The History of Halloween
Published 25/10/2021
The time of year when the days get shorter, colder and you start thinking Christmas is only around the corner! But we’re not here to talk about Santa Claus just yet, we’re here to enlighten you on the second biggest holiday in America, and that is Halloween! Trick-or-treating, fancy dress and apple bobbing are a few of the few traditions for the day that falls on 31st October. But, have you ever thought about why we do these traditions? And where did they originate from?
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Do I need a vaccine passport in the UK?
Published 21/10/2021
There are different rules between countries in the UK regarding vaccine passports. In this blog, we’re going to clear up any confusion and set you straight on what the rules are for each country.
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6 Great Books to Help Teach Your Child About Grief and Loss
Published 18/10/2021
Grief and loss is a difficult concept to wrap your head around as an adult, let alone as a child who is just trying their best to figure this world out. Thankfully there are a few helpful resources available to help you start that awkward conversation, and what better way than to read a story book together that is aimed directly at the child and their level of understanding. We have taken a look through the top rated children’s books on Amazon.co.uk about grief and loss, and we have made a list of the top six based on highest score and number of ratings.
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What do I write in a funeral notice?
Published 14/10/2021
When it comes to writing a funeral notice or obituary, people often wonder where to start. We are often asked what to include, what the legal requirements are and if there are any ‘do’s and don’ts’ when writing a funeral notice. The truth is there aren’t any rules or laws about the information you choose to write in a funeral notice, but given the nature of the notice and the circumstance people find themselves in when trying to find the words for a notice, it is helpful to have a rough guide to work from. In today’s blog, I am going to offer some advice on what you need to consider when approaching a funeral notice, should you ever find yourself in the sad position of having to write one.
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How to cope with darker nights
Published 11/10/2021
The combination of shorter days and gloomy weather at this time of year can take its toll on your mental health. It affects everyone differently, but can be worse for those who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Today I’m going to share some tips to hopefully help you cope with the darker nights and shorter days. Bring the light inside Make sure your house is well lit to compensate for the darkness outside. You could use fairy lights to brighten up your living room, or take advantage of the abundance of autumn scented candles that are available at this time of year. If you have an open fire, this can bring both light and warmth into your house. Go out You may be tempted to stay in because of the dark nights and cold weather, but this can be bad for your mental health. Getting out on an evening can do wonders for your mood, and it is important not to put your life on hold during the winter months. Invite people over Having friends and family over on an evening is a great way to combat the winter blues. You could have a dinner party with autumnal recipes, or just a get-together with snacks and drinks. Go for a daylight walk Going for a walk during the day when it is still light outside can help to keep your spirits up in the winter months. Try to get out during your lunch break or in the morning, or go for regular long walks on your days off. Exercise It’s always important to get enough exercise, but it’s even more important during the winter months. You may not feel like exercising when it’s cold and dark, but it can help you to warm up, release endorphins to improve your mood and can even reduce tiredness caused by the darkness.
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Can I bury my pet in my garden?
Published 07/10/2021
Pets are often thought of as members of the family, so it can be extremely difficult to cope with the loss when they pass away. Some pet owners like the idea of burying their pet in the garden of the house they lived in; this keeps them close, and allows them to remain in the home they loved. However, there are rules and regulations to be followed if you wish to bury your pet at home. Most of the rules are simple and make sense; the remains must not be buried near a water source, they must be buried beneath 2-3ft of soil, you must own the land, and the animal must not be hazardous to bury. For more information see this Mirror article: Burying a pet in the garden could land you a £5,000 fine unless you follow certain rules It is also advised that the remains be placed in a bag or box before they are buried, to avoid them being disturbed by other animals. If these regulations are not followed, you could face a fine or even a short imprisonment. You do not need permission or planning consent, you are free to bury your pet in your garden as long as the rules are followed, which may help to give you peace of mind after their death. Alternatively some people choose to get their pet cremated, and either scatter the ashes or keep them in their home. This means that if you were to move home in the future you could take the remains with you, which you would be unable to do if you buried your pet. If you have lost a pet recently and are struggling to cope with your grief, take a look at our blog on how to cope with the death of a pet: How to cope with the death of a pet Thank you for reading.
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